Learning to Love My Broken Self

Acceptance (kimbrowntoday.com)

The idea that we’re all broken isn’t a popular one. It seems many dislike the term because they assume it means either:

  • Unfixable, or

  • Unlovable

But it means neither. In fact, it means quite the opposite. Jesus famously taught that we are all broken (John 3:16, Romans 5:8), but that we are also:

  • Fixableit’s called discipleship — think “apprenticeship,” a journey of transformation, not an app you download; and that we are…

  • Lovableright now, even while we’re still in the process of being fixed.

My own brokenness has a lot to do with my hard-wired ADHD and OCD, as well as the bad habits and wrong-headed notions that have been layered on top of that wiring ever since. All of which have helped lay the groundwork for my particular brand of what, until recently, people called sin, mistreating or using others, God, and yes, even ourselves.

Result? I sometimes struggle with liking and accepting myself (I believe self-love is a given, but self-like isn’t!) So here’s a parallel that helps me correct my attitude towards myself:

Can and should a person with, say, no legs like/love themself? Of course! But that doesn’t mean they can’t and shouldn’t fix the problem (who hasn’t seen or cheered some overcoming Paralympian or physically-challenged performer/teacher/scientist, etc.?). And it also doesn’t mean they shouldn’t address their own subsequent sinful behaviors.

So here’s to liking (accepting) and loving ourselves right now—even while we strive to be proud of…

The person we’re becoming!

About mitchteemley

Writer, Filmmaker, Humorist, Thinker-about-stuffer
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41 Responses to Learning to Love My Broken Self

  1. Webb Blogs says:

    Wonderful post Mitch. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  2. You’ve shared some very important ideas here, Mitch. I know this post will speak to someone in exactly the way they need to hear it.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. It took me years to accept and love my broken self. In so doing, I was also able to accept and love others with their own brokenness.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Monica Locke says:

    So very good!!!! 🙌🏻❤️🙌🏻

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Anonymous says:

    A needed post in this period of Covid-19. Thank you Mitch for this touching post..

    Liked by 3 people

  6. I’ve always said that we’re all neurotic to a certaain degree. How can we not be with all the stressers we face each day. That’s certainly not to say we’re all at a clinical stage, but none of us can point a finger at the other.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. We’re all on the same journey …

    Liked by 4 people

  8. Gypsy says:

    Beautiful! Here’s to acceptance and conscious efforts to get better 🥂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Most people don’t want to show vulnerability. So we paint over our inadequacies and pretend they don’t exist. Your suggested course of action is better. We are all recovering from something.

    Liked by 5 people

  10. Great posting, Mitch! Thank you for sharing, and have a beautiful weekend/ Sunday! xx Michael

    Liked by 3 people

  11. I’m not striving to be proud of myself, just thankful.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. cindy knoke says:

    So important. Learning that I was quote, “Loved beyond my ability to understand,” completely changed my life. Not because I was perfect, but because I wasn’t.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. CG Thelen says:

    So much truth, Mitch. Recognizing my brokenness opened me up to God’s love and grace.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Yernasia Quorelios says:

    💜 As an Atheist with an Academic Interest in Religions and Icons I Do Wonder if Jesus ever considered HimSelf “broken” EveryOne; in My View, the answer is NO!!! Never Ever until Nailed to a Cross blaming His Dad (“Why have you forsaken me Father; I give up the ghost.”)…if He Ever Experienced a “Mental Health” Condition it was Arrogance; only On The Cross did He Remember Humility and Rose to The Delight of The Two Marys Three Days Later and of course The 24 Disciples

    …💛💚💙…

    Like

    • mitchteemley says:

      That’s an novel take, my friend. Not what the biblical writings say, but interesting.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yernasia Quorelios says:

        💜 Thank YOU!!! for Keeping an Open Mind as Brother Jesu Encourages SupaSoulBro; put Simply We Do NOT!!! Have to Believe EveryThing We Read like this Tiny Flu Virus Thingy NoneSense

        …💛💚💙…

        Like

      • mitchteemley says:

        Of course we don’t. But we do need to keep an open mind and heart. I was formerly an atheist myself, but the teachings and character of Jesus changed me.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Yernasia Quorelios says:

        💎 – Diamond Hard – 💎

        💎 It’s Worth Noting EveryOne, Brother Jesu was NEVER!!! a Christian, that was Roman Emperor Constantine at The Turn of The 20th Century to Protect The Followers of Christ and His 24 Disciples; it’s Crystal Clear Clarity that He, Jesus, Enjoyed Life…was Gluttonous and Alcoholic; remember “Water in to Wine” at ‘The Wedding in Canaan’ and The Feeding of The 5000, Don’t Even Get Me Started on The Chaste Prostitutes like Ms Magdalena whose Feet He Washed…the Problem with Those Who Study The Bible in its Various, Mixed, Multitudinous Glorious Versions is that They Don’t Get It; so, instead, They CHOOSE!!! To Cherry Pick and Confuse ThemSelves with The THOUGHT!!! of Heaven or Hell After Dying

        💎 – Diamond Hard – 💎

        …💎💎💎…

        Like

      • mitchteemley says:

        I’m not sure where you’re getting all of this, Yernasia. “Christian” is a term applied that was first applied to Jesus’ followers in Antioch during the time of the Apostle Paul [Acts 11:26] and means “like Christ.” Emperor Constantine lived during the 4th century, not the 20th, at which point there had been Christians for three centuries. There were 12 original Apostles (not 24) and many other disciples. The ideas that Jesus’ acts of kindness and grace prove he was an alcoholic and glutton who had sex with prostitutes would be offensive if it wasn’t so absurd. There’s nothing in any ancient manuscripts that indicates anything like that (biblical or otherwise), and it completely contradicts everything we know about Jesus.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Tim Harlow says:

    Wonderfully said, Mitch! Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. E says:

    It sure does take us a while to get there, huh? ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Thank you for sharing, I try to see it as no ones perfect but we are all valuable in our own way

    Liked by 1 person

  18. c.f. leach says:

    Great post my friend. Society’s measuring stick has beat most of us to death with their standards. And in those standards we find many of our inadequecies—wrong ruler. Jesus loves me this I know—so right now I am in the process of learning to love myself all over again. Thanks for sharing. Blessings and Peace!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. gregoryjoel says:

    You reminded me of a dear friend that used to tell me that SIN is Self Inflicted Nonsense )I hadn’t thought of that one in a long time). Getting past my failures and subsequent self-loathing was impossible until God taught me His way of seeing the world and thus, myself. Thanks for a great read this morning.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. A sense of humor helps. I saw a t-shirt that would be fitting for both of us. It says, “I have OCD and ADD. So everything has to be perfect. But just for a little while.” 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Looking deep inside and acknowledging all my broken shattered parts has given me such a window to new growth and all the amazing opportunity He has for me to serve Him better. 🌱

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Pingback: Don’t Love Yourself! | Mitch Teemley

  23. Pingback: Don’t Love Yourself! | Cyber Support Group

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